“Just” My Parents?

Is it really good to go home for the summer?
Heading home for the summer!

With another year of college behind me, I recently packed up my apartment and headed home. Although I was unbelievably busy this semester and definitely overworked at times, I had a great junior year. I’ve truly put down roots in the college town where I spend the school year now, so it was with mixed emotions that I pulled into my parents’ driveway for the summer.

I love being at home, I love not having to cook or do my laundry or go to the store, and I love seeing my family. But the problem with being home is that it brings back bad memories and makes me feel like less of an adult sometimes.

Since I’m twenty-one now, I’m anxious to establish myself as an independent adult. I couldn’t ask for better parents, but my relationship with them has regressed over the last couple of years as a result of my illness. I’ve still not been able to have a steady job, so I’m financially dependent on my parents for almost everything. While I’m grateful that they’re able to support me, as a matter of pride, I wish I could balance school and a job and PANS well enough to establish some independence.

However, the main regression has not been financial, but the roles my parents have taken on as a result of PANS. When I was nineteen years old, they basically watched me all the time and didn’t let me go anywhere without them knowing, because I was suicidal. At twenty, during flares, I would scream at the top of my lungs in terror and throw myself into my mom’s lap like a five-year-old. Even in the better times, I deferred to my parents’ judgement on most matters, because I didn’t trust my inflamed brain to make rational decisions. I loved my parents and they obviously loved me, but this was nowhere near a typical relationship to have with one’s parents at my age—though it was exactly what I needed at the time.

Now that I’m well again, I think we’re all trying to create new boundaries, and sometimes, it feels a bit awkward to me. I’ve had to reestablish my ability to make my own decisions. I’ve had to learn to think of my parents as just my parents instead of as my caretakers.  We’re discovering how to have conversations where symptoms and appointments are never discussed. We’re figuring out what I should and shouldn’t be allowed to do on my own now—like the adolescence that I never had.

Every relationship, like recovery, is a process.  No one is perfect, so there will always be flaws and disagreements in a relationship.  But if you love someone, you make it work.  My parents and I are very close, even though our relationship is changing.  But I believe this change is a good thing, because I’m growing up and getting better.

And despite some awkwardness, I’m glad to be home and to be together with my family for a few months. This is the first summer that I’m actually well and not pursuing additional treatment, so I’m going to be thankful for that and try to just enjoy spending time with my loved ones.

8 thoughts on ““Just” My Parents?

  1. What a great perspective on the “adolescence you never had”. Helps to hear as many parents of PANS’ worry they have not helped them be independent-and this is a reminder not to panic or give up. It’s going to happen on the time line that is realistic to the recovery. Thanks.

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  2. I look forward to this level of maturity and relationship with my son, where none of our interactions revolve around his PANS. Congratulations on the completion of another year in college. Enjoy your summer!

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